Shoda Lab

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SHODA LAB MEMBERS


Nicole Wilson, Dawn DeGere, Yuichi Shoda, Kristen Lindgren, Mara Sedlins, Jenna Lee, Donna Whitsett, Vivian Zayas.



Yuichi Shoda
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                            
ABOUT ME
I was born and grew up in Japan. I was studying physics at Hokkaido University in Sapporo, Japan, when I got permanently (so far) sidetracked into psychology and across the Pacific Ocean. After attending the University of California, Santa Cruz, I started graduate school in psychology at Stanford, and finished at Columbia University. I joined the University of Washington in 1996 and ever since have been counting my blessings for being able to work with students and colleagues breaking new ground in the understanding human experience and behavior as these unfold in individuals' lives. I enjoy life in the Pacific Northwest, a wonderful blend of culture and nature.
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                             

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Vivian Zayas, Postdoctoral Fellow
RESEARCH INTERESTS
A defining feature of the human experience is close, intimate relationships. Experiences within close relationships are rich and colorful and vary greatly both within and across individuals. My research program examines the processes that shape peopleís feelings, thoughts, and behaviors within close relationships. Reflecting the breadth and complexity of the topic, my research seeks to understand both intraindividual and interindividual processes using a variety of methodological tools (e.g., self-report, implicit, and physiological) and experimental designs (laboratory and longitudinal). The core questions that guide my research are: What are the cognitions and affects that are likely to play an important role within social and interpersonal contexts? Are there individual differences in these automatic processes? If so, are they related to peopleís experiences within close relationships? What role do early relationship experiences (e.g., interactions with oneís mother) play in how a person experiences relationships, and self, in later life? How do people shape their social worlds through the choices they make in dating partners? Although the questions are diverse, mirroring the topic itself, I seek to integrate my research findings on intra and interindividual processes within a single, coherent, unifying framework. This framework highlights how a personís behavior emerges out of the continuous interactions between her personal characteristics and the characteristics that define the social and interpersonal contexts in which she lives (Zayas, Shoda, Ayduk, 2002).

      PROJECTS:
      stability of attachment representations
      partner preference
      significant person IAT
      significant person priming
      subliminal person perception
            -subliminal face perception
ABOUT ME
[more to come soon!]                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                            

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Dawn DeGere, Graduate Student
RESEARCH INTERESTS
I study the effects of emotion regulation on interpersonal and intrapersonal processes. Specifically, I am interested in how regulating the behaviors related to emotion (e.g., suppressing any expressions of negative emotion, or masking them with expressions of positive emotion) impacts 1) the individual who is regulating emotion, and 2) the social interactions that person engages in. Much of my work examines dyadic interactions between unacquainted individuals to gauge the effects of these regulatory strategies on factors such as affiliation and social perception.

I am also interested in the interplay of individual differences and situational cues in determining an individual's emotional response. That is, I am interested in determining those key ingredients in a given situation that elicit different emotions in different individuals.

      PROJECTS:
      Effect of Masking on Rapport and Impression Formation
ABOUT ME
I am a fourth-year graduate student in the Social Psychology and Personality program. Prior to moving to Seattle, I obtained a B.A. in Psychology at the University of San Francisco, with an undergraduate honors thesis on hemispheric asymmetry, olfactory stimulation, and mood. I then went on to conduct research on display rules for emotion expression in various social contexts while at the Culture and Emotion Research Lab at San Francisco State University.

Outside of the lab, I enjoy organic gardening, jewelry and metalsmithing, art, and architecture.

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Jenna Lee, Graduate Student
RESEARCH INTERESTS
My research tends to address the following questions: (1) Are there individual differences in how people structure their perception, conception, and experience of emotions? (2) Do individual have stable patterns of emotional response to social situational cues? If so, what are these meaningful cues? (3) And, are there individual differences factors (especially cultural differences) that explain the relationship between certain group members and their patterns of emotional perceptions and response?

In addition, I do subliminal face perception and subliminal mere exposure research.

      PROJECTS:
      Culture and Self-Evaluation
      Culture and Emotion
      Responses to Acquaintance Sexual Aggression Scenarios
      Subliminal Face Perception
      Subliminal Mere Exposure
ABOUT ME
After a not-so-lucrative first career as a baby model in Seoul, I moved to California. I spent most of my childhood in the suburbs of Huntington Beach until I left for college at Berkeley. As an undergraduate, I fell in love with ancient Indian civilization and cognitive psychology. The common draw was their focus on perception and how people construct their knowledge about the world. At the University of Washington, I try to transpose this interest onto my social-cognitive research. I hope to better understand people's unique experience of their social world.

Coffee shops are my labs away from lab. I have only recently taken the first steps of occasionally leaving them to explore the rest of the Pacific Northwest. I am also a cinephile.

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Kristen Lindgren, Graduate Student
RESEARCH INTERESTS
I am a graduate student in the clinical psychology program. My research focuses on how individuals figure out or assess other people's intentions, in particular romantic and sexual intentions. I am interested in using Dr. Shoda's approach to conceptualizing personality (e.g., stable, but complex, if-then patterns) to understand individual differences in sexual intent perceptions. This domain (sexual intentions) is of interest to me because of links to maladaptive behaviors, including acquaintance rape and sexual harassment.

      PROJECTS:
      Sexual Intent Perceptions
ABOUT ME
In addition to research, I also teach two classes. One is an upper-level undergraduate seminar on intimate relationship (I co-teach this class with Dr. Zayas), and the other is a graduate statistics lab class. Outside of the lab and other grad school responsibilities, I am still recovering from my misspent youth. The Sopranos is filmed two towns over from where I grew up. I also read lots of fiction, take advantage of Washington State's outdoors, and frequent many of Seattle's coffee shops.

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Mara Sedlins, Graduate Student
RESEARCH INTERESTS
I do research on the "mental landscapes" of individuals, using a computer comparison task to understand the systematic ways in which people perceive various stimuli. I am interested in what features of these stimuli people use to differentiate among them, and what kinds of individual differences can be used to predict what the important features will be.

      PROJECTS:
      "Mental Landscapes" Methodology
ABOUT ME
I earned my bachelor's degree in psychology and mathematics at St. Olaf College in Northfield, MN in 2003. I spent most of my time as an undergraduate playing in the St. Olaf Orchestra and doing research on people's mental imagery of numbers. Current non-research interests include: playing the violin, participating in the UW judo club, and attempting to l earn Latvian.

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Donna Whitsett, Graduate Student
RESEARCH INTERESTS
My research focus concerns how the expression of distress affects the amount and type of social support one receives. Specifically, I have examined the impact of the suppression (i.e., the downplay of facial or verbal expressions) of negative emotion on levels of received social support. My current research allows for the examination of cues that lead to support provision from different subgroups of listeners. For example, what types of listeners are most turned away by expressions of extreme distress? On the other hand, for which listeners is the expression of a higher level of distress necessary to motivate support provision?

      PROJECTS:
      Elicitation of Social Support
ABOUT ME
I grew up in Houston, TX, where I mostly failed to develop a southern accent. Besides family and friends, the only things I really miss are decent Tex-Mex taquerias, especially those serving breakfast tacos.

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Nicole Wilson, Graduate Student
RESEARCH INTERESTS
In a very general sense, I am interested in stress and coping in a Ďnormalí or non-clinical population. Specifically, my research focuses on whether, for each individual, there may be a unique and stable set of situation features that elicit a stress response. Knowing the characteristics of situations that elicit a stress response may provide individuals with ways to manage and reduce their stress.

      PROJECTS:
      coming soon!
ABOUT ME
I earned a B.A. and an M.S. in psychology from University of Oregon (Go Ducks!). I then spent a few years working as a research assistant at Oregon Research Institute, where I worked primarily on an intervention project investigating the utility of Tai Chi for seniors. In my spare time I enjoy running (Iíve completed three marathons) and hot yoga. I also have a passion for beautiful food, which translates into a sometimes rather all-consuming hobby as an amateur pastry chef.

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